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Home Learning Policy

Home Learning Policy

 

Lead Person Wendy Stone

Review Date December 2018

Policy Ratification Date – 16th December 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minster Church of England Primary School

 

Home Learning Policy

‘Ready to Face the World’

Our school has a warm, Christian family ethos where our children thrive in a secure and happy atmosphere. They are fully supported and nurtured from when they join us until they leave our care.

 

Minster Primary School is a Church of England Primary School and our Christian values are at the heart of everything we do.

  • Creation
  • Friendship
  • Forgiveness
  • Justice
  • Peace

 

These are then underpinned by our learning values.

  • Christianity
  • Independence
  • Aspiration
  • Engagement
  • Resilience

 

Our whole school ethos for learning and behaviour is guided by them. Each aspect of school life is encountered through these values to establish a forward thinking, diverse and innovative culture in which our entire school community flourishes.

Every school policy is written with this in mind

 

 

 

 

 

The Minster CE Primary School

Home Learning Policy

 

Home learning is anything children do outside the normal school day that contributes to their learning, in response to guidance from the school. Home learning encompasses a whole variety of activities instigated by teachers and parents/carers to support the children's learning. For example, parents or carers who spend time reading stories to their children before bedtime are helping with home learning.

 

Rationale

Home learning is an important part of a child's education, and can add much to a child's development.

 

We see home learning as an important example of cooperation between teachers and parents/carers. One of the aims of our teaching is for children to develop as independent learners, and we believe that doing home learning is one of the main ways in which children can acquire the skill of independent learning.

 

Home learning plays a positive role in raising a child's level of attainment. However, we also acknowledge the important role of play and free time in a child's growth and development. While home learning is important, it should not prevent children from taking part in the activities of various out-of-school clubs and of other organisations that play an important part in the lives of our pupils. We are well aware that children spend more time at home than at school, and we believe that they develop their interests and skills to the full only when parents/carers encourage them to make maximum use of the opportunities available outside school.

 

Aims and objectives

The aims and objectives of home learning are to:

• enable pupils to make maximum progress in their academic and social development;

• help pupils develop the skills of an independent learner;

• promote cooperation between home and school in supporting each child's learning;

• enable some aspects of the curriculum to be further explored independently;

• provide educational experiences not possible in school;

• consolidate and reinforce the learning done in school, and to allow children to practice skills taught in lessons;

• help children develop good work habits for the future.

 

Foundation Stage and Year One

  • We ask that parents listen to their children read at least 5 times a week for 10 minutes at a time. We also believe that parents should read books to their child. Sharing books is just as valuable in aiding a child’s progress in reading as is your child reading to you or to their teachers.

  • Children will also have a ‘Love for Learning’ Book to complete various ‘fun and engaging’ curriculum tasks.

  • In addition to this, it is recommended that Termly ‘Learn Its’ from Little Big Maths are practised each night for 5 minutes.

 

Years 2, 3 and 4

Home Learning will be set by the teachers with the expectation that each task last no longer than 20 minutes.

  • Children will be expected to read 5 x weekly

  • Arithmetic work will be given that consolidates the children’s learning based upon their learning during the previous school week.

  • Teachers are to alternate English home learning between Grammar and Punctuation and Spellings work.

  • Children are to practise their Learn Its from Big Maths 5 x weekly as well as learning their times tables

 

Years 5 and 6

Home Learning will be set by the teachers with the expectation that each task last no longer than 30 minutes.

  • Children will be expected to read 5 x weekly

  • Arithmetic work will be given that consolidates the children’s learning based upon their learning during the previous school week.

  • Teachers are to alternate English home learning between Grammar and Punctuation and Spellings work.

  • Children are to practise their Learn Its from Big Maths 5 x weekly as well as learning their times tables

Individual Needs

There may be occasions where a teacher feels additional learning may help a child’s education. This could be something specific to the individual e.g. word banks, specific handwriting letter formation, number formation etc. If this is the case, the class teacher will make parents aware and ask them to work on this learning with their child at home in addition to the above.

 

Projects

Children may be set a project based on the topic they are learning in school. They may be set the project half way through the seasonal term. If this is the case they will be expected to hand in their completed project after the holiday/break period. At the beginning of each term a newsletter will be sent out to parents containing their class topics and home learning expectations for the specific year group.

 

Marking and Feedback

Home Learning is always acknowledged and, according to the task, is either marked or used in class to support learning. For example, whereas a Maths task would be marked according to the school marking policy, a topic research task may be shared in the lesson or used as part of a group activity. Home Learning completed well, is acknowledged and praised. There may be issues arising from the work, which the teacher will follow up in lesson time. We recognise that children have individual learning styles, which means that some tasks can be completed in a number of different ways, while others demand a particular approach.

 

Inclusion and Home Learning

We set home learning for all children as a normal part of school life. We ensure that all tasks set are appropriate to the ability of the child, and we endeavour to adapt any task set so that all children can contribute in a positive way.

 

The role of parents and carers

Parents and carers have a vital role to play in their child's education, and home learning is an important part of this process. We ask parents and carers to encourage their child to complete the home learning tasks that are set. We invite them to help their children as and when they feel it to be necessary and to provide them with the sort of environment that allows children to do their best. Parents and carers can support their child by providing a good working space at home, by enabling their child to visit the library regularly, and by discussing the work that their child is doing.

 

Ideally parents should read with their children every day to help them develop a love of books and stories and help them to grow in confidence. We ask parents and carers to sign their child’s Reading Record to show that they have heard their child read and discussed their books with them.

 

Use of ICT

The use of ICT and the Internet has made a significant contribution to the amount of reference material available at home, and the ease and speed with which it can be accessed. However, our teachers expect their pupils to produce their own work, perhaps by editing something they have found, or by expressing it in their own words. The children are not achieving anything worthwhile by copying, pasting and printing out something that has been written by somebody else.

 

There are many websites containing highly educational material which can have a powerful effect on children's learning. A copy of the school’s E-Safety policy is available from the school office and may also be found on the school website. The child’s safety is paramount in all matters regarding use of the internet and we advise parents and carers to always supervise their child’s access to the internet.

 

We discourage children from bringing computer disks or memory sticks into school, because of the risk of viruses. However, when appropriate, a teacher might suggest that a child's work is e-mailed to the teacher at school via the office email account.

 

 

 

 

 

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