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Behaviour Policy Rewards & Sanctions

Minster Church of England Primary School

Behaviour Policy

Rewards and Sanctions

 

Lead Person                Wendy Stone

 

Policy Date         November 2015  

 

Review Date               November 2018  

 

Policy Ratification Date - 10th November 15

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Minster Church of England Primary School

Behaviour Policy

 

 ‘Ready to Face the World’

 

Our school has a warm, Christian family ethos where our children thrive in a secure and happy atmosphere. They are fully supported and nurtured from when they join us until they leave our care.

 

Minster Primary School is a Church of England Primary School and our Christian values are at the heart of everything we do. 

  • Creation
  • Friendship
  • Forgiveness
  • Justice
  • Peace

 

These are then underpinned by our learning values.

  • Christianity
  • Independence
  • Aspiration
  • Engagement
  • Resilience

 

Our whole school ethos for learning and behaviour is guided by them. Each aspect of

school life is encountered through these values to establish a forward thinking, diverse and innovative culture in which our entire school community flourishes.

Every school policy is written with this in mind.

 

Behaviour

 

Introduction:

This document is a statement of the aims, principles and strategies for Minster C of E Primary School.

 

DfES guidelines have been taken into consideration in the formulation of this policy. It should be read in conjunction with the SEND policy, Anti-Bullying policy, PSHE policy, Safeguarding policies and the policy for teaching and learning to establish the general ethos of the school.

 

Aims:

This document provides a framework for the creation of a happy, secure and orderly environment in which children can learn and develop as caring and responsible people. It is written for all members of the school community to allow each one to understand the policy of the school and to apply it consistently and fairly.

 

It aims:

 

  • To ensure appropriate behaviour and language throughout the school
  • To encourage and praise greater effort in both work and behaviour

  • To prevent bullying
  • To promote good citizenship
  • To promote self discipline
  • To ensure a whole school approach to discipline which is used and approved by all the staff in the school – teaching and non-teaching staff
  • To ensure that parents are informed and are aware of the disciplinary procedures
  • To provide a system of rewards to encourage good behaviour and to try and reverse continuous and habitual offenders by using assertive discipline techniques

 

Principles:

Every child has the right to learn but no child has the right to disrupt the learning of others.

 

The establishment of a sound, positive and caring ethos is an essential prerequisite for learning. It depends upon trusting relationships and a process of co-operative teamwork and the school welcomes and encourages the involvement of the LA, governors, parents and carers and others in the community.

 

Responsibilities:

Teachers have primary responsibility for the behaviour of the children in their class.

All members of the school community – teaching and non-teaching staff, parents, pupils and governors – work towards the school aims by:
 

  • Providing a well ordered environment in which all are fully aware of behaviour expectations
  • Treating all children and adults as individuals and respecting their rights, values and beliefs

  • Fostering and promoting good relationships and a sense of belonging to the school community
  • Offering equal opportunities in all aspects of school life and recognising the importance of different cultures
  • Encouraging, praising and positively reinforcing good relationships, behaviours and work
  • Rejecting all bullying, discrimination or harassment in any form
  • Helping to develop strategies to eliminate undesirable behaviour both within and outside the classroom, and applying these consistently
  • Caring for, and taking pride in, the physical environment of the school
  • Working as a team, supporting and encouraging each other.

 

Rules:

The school rules have been devised over a period of time in consultation with all stakeholders and with our Christian ethos in mind. At the beginning of every school year Teachers will provide an opportunity for their class to discuss the school rules and ensure they are fully understood and accepted. All rules will be displayed in the appropriate place. Some classes may wish to have other classroom rules as well as our 5 school rules.

 

School Rules

Minster Church of England Primary School Rules

Creation

Be respectful and care for our school

Forgiveness

Be kind and think of others11:18

Friendship

Be the best friend that you can be

Justice

Be fair and do what is right

Peace

Be safe and live together in harmony

 

Rewards and Sanctions

At Minster C of E Primary School we have developed a system of Rewards and Sanctions that works well in our school environment and enhances our school ethos. All staff are required to follow our Rewards and Sanctions within this policy, as consistency is vital.

 

Exclusion:

We will ensure that the LA guidelines are followed for exclusions. Parents will be notified of the reason for the exclusion. Before the child is re-admitted to school, a meeting between the parents and the school will be arranged. The purpose of the meeting will be to discuss strategies and agree a way forward to ensure no repetition of the offending behaviour pattern.

 

A written record of the discussion, and commitments to the agreed plan, by both the parents and the school, will be made. One copy will be kept in the school’s record and one sent to the parent.

 

We provide a number of opportunities for children to discuss their behaviour including:

 

  • Talking with the class teacher, teaching assistant or senior member of staff
  • Access to a counsellor when available
  • A programme of personal social and health education set in a moral framework designed to promote mutual respect, self-discipline and social responsibility (see PSHE policy)
  • A clear focus for work on relationships and feelings as part of the PSHE work throughout school
  • A programme of religious education which includes ethical issues (see RE policy) 
  • Circle time – an opportunity for open discussion held in class groups at regular intervals
  • The agreement of a set of rules by each class at the beginning of Term 1
  • Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural activities
  • The pastoral support team comprising of the SLT, Mentors and the Flo

 

 

Liaison with Parents:

Parents will be kept informed about their child’s behaviour through formal Parent consultations/letters and informal meetings if and when the need arises. They will also receive a Seasonal report which gives an indication of how their child is doing with regard to our ‘Good to be Green’ system.

 

Parents will also be informed if their child’s behaviour means they receive a red card on the ‘Good to be Green’ system (this is an exit from the classroom to a member of the SLT). Parents will be informed on the day by the class teacher should this happen, but will also contacted on a more formal basis should it build up to 2 or more in any term to discuss ways to address this issue.

 

Visitors in School:

The school rules are displayed around the school and if we have any school visitors that wish to know our expectations they are welcome to read our policy. If visitors have any worries about behavior we ask that they consult a member of staff immediately who can address the situation.

 

Outside Agencies:

There are times when the advice of outside agencies will be required. This will be the result of discussion between interested parties such as the parent, class teacher, Inclusion Leader or Headteacher, or as the result of discussion at LIFT (Local Inclusion Forum Team Meeting) , which takes place on a regular basis.

 

Outside agencies can include, Specialist Teacher Service, Educational Psychologist, Teacher for Hearing or Visually Impaired, Speech Therapist, Occupational therapist, Pre-School Advisor, FISS, PIP, School Doctor and Social Services.

 

Monitoring:

In light of this policy the SLT will continually monitor the behaviour throughout the school.

 

 

Rewards and Sanctions

 

At Minster C of E Primary School we believe it is vital to have a clear and consistent approach for both Rewards and Sanctions that are used by all members of staff regardless of their individual role. Although it is consistent, that doesn’t mean it is always the same. The structure should always be followed even if it is adapted to meet the needs of individuals of differing ages, abilities and levels of understanding.

 

The important fact is that all staff,  whether Teachers, TAs, Cover Supervisors, Dinner Supervisors and including Supply Staff, are aware of the rules, our ‘Good to be Green’ procedure and then consistently apply the relative Rewards and Sanctions.

 

The main aim is to avoid giving attention and time to bad behaviour. We believe that positive praise for good behaviour helps to set the standards for all children, aids intrinsic knowledge of how to behave thus developing control over their own behaviour. It also encourages the repetition of such behaviour and provides role models for all children.

 

If there are difficulties either in class or around the school it is vital that children are asked what the problems are and are given an opportunity to voice their feelings and their version of events. This will ensure that children feel they are listened to and this helps them to understand that in school we are fair to all children.

 

The most important reward first and foremost is verbal praise from any teacher or adult that recognises the desired behaviour we want to encourage in school. Either on a one to one basis or in front of others, this can be a huge reward and confidence boost for a child. Any child who has behaved exceptionally well (or completed a good piece of work) may be asked to visit the other teacher in the year group, a Senior Leader or the Headteacher. This could be for verbal praise, stamps or stickers, etc. Minster Medals may also be given out by any member of the staff where they recognise that children are behaving exceptionally well by demonstrating good manners and thinking of others.

 

‘Good to be Green’ – (See also G2BG Quick guide - Appendix 1)

Good to be Green is the cornerstone of our whole school policy. Each classroom has a ‘Good to be Green’ chart and each child has a ‘Good to be Green’ card on the chart. The children automatically receive a behaviour voucher at the beginning of every day because their card is green. They can then save their vouchers to spend at the voucher shop which opens every seasonal term. The children lose their voucher for the day if they have their card turned over (showing the white side – reaching Level 2). Therefore the better behaved they are the more rewards they get. This ensures that those children who are always well behaved are rewarded and are in control of their own behaviour. They act as good role models for the children who need support with their behaviour. We believe that this approach ensures consistency and aids the child’s understanding of expectations regardless of which class or year they are in. It also provides the adults in school with a systematic way to deal with any unwanted behaviour. Children will not receive a voucher for any days they are absent from school.

 

The ‘Good to be Green’ system is used across all year groups in the school.

 

The children all have a named pocket on the ‘Good to be Green’ chart in the classroom. At the beginning of the day they all start with the ‘Good to be Green’ showing. If there are issues with behaviour and the usual distraction techniques or quiet reminders haven’t restored the expected behaviour, the following system is then put in place.

 

 

As part of quality first teaching all members of staff should use the techniques and strategies they have developed to control and diffuse any potential behaviour problems as part of the daily expectation.

 

When children go beyond this, after informal warnings and strategies have been used ‘Good to be Green’ comes into play.

 

 

Good to be Green

Start

Green Card on display at beginning of every day

Step 1

Formal verbal warning given to the child and Good to be Green card is ‘upended’ and a reminder that if behaviour continues the behaviour voucher will be lost.

Step 2

If poor behaviour continues the card is then turned over (so it is white) and the child loses their behaviour voucher. The child should be encouraged to tell their parent.

Card turned (White) - losing their behaviour voucher for the day and possible sanctions

Step 3

The next incident of poor behaviour results in the yellow warning card being displayed. Verbal warning that the next time they misbehave they will get a red card and be exited from class. If children are in danger of being exited at this stage a mentor should be called to support the child.

Step 4

Finally, another incident would lead to a red card and exit from class to the KS Leader or another member of SLT if KS Leader not available. Mentors will transport the child to the member of SLT.  Parents should be informed by the class teacher that day. The teacher must fill in an exit form and give to the mentors.

 

 

Progress through the levels

Individual children may progress more quickly through the levels than others. Some children may also have personalised behaviour strategies in place through Inclusion. These usually fit with this system easily, occasionally small adjustments may need to be made. All adults who are in contact need to know about children with such initiatives.

 

It is important that the sanction is the right one for the problem. For example, if a child has displayed unwanted behaviour but it was a small incident it would be inappropriate to send them out of class for the whole session, as this then lessens the impact of the sanction for more severe unwanted behaviour. It could also reduce the child’s ability to understand the ‘fairness’ of the situation and the hierarchy of sanctions.   

 

If a child refuses to comply, the adult in control may need to ask a mentor or a member of SLT to come and assist with the situation. It is important that inappropriate behaviour is dealt with quickly and appropriately with as little disruption as possible to other children. In severe cases, there may already be a plan in place where removing the child from the situation is the first but most appropriate course of action. If a child has to be positively handled, this will be done by appropriately trained staff and in accordance with our Positive Handling Policy.

 

It is vitally important that parents are made aware of difficulties with their child’s behaviour as soon as possible whether it is one high-level incident or consistent low-level problems. All teachers are asked to invite parents into school to discuss such issues.

 

If unacceptable behaviour continues then outside agencies may be consulted. In extreme cases, if all possible steps have been taken and the situation has not been resolved then fixed short-term exclusions may need to be put in place. This could lead to a permanent exclusion in a worst-case scenario.

 

Sanctions

 

The class teacher is responsible for the behaviour of all the pupils in their class at all times.

 

Distraction/diffusion techniques (See Appendix 2)

It is vital that distraction/diffusion techniques are employed as part of this policy. An adult who is aware of appropriate techniques that can be used can often quickly limit inappropriate behaviour without having to sanction a child. For example there may be occasions when the best strategy to use is to praise and reward the children who are displaying the behaviour required, rather than focussing on the bad behaviour exhibited. To aid staff there is a list in Appendix B of possible techniques that can be used.

 

Time out

Time out is a strategy that can be used for any individual where adult managing the situation feels it is appropriate. A child who may find it difficult to respond appropriately whilst angry, can be given the opportunity to think quietly about what has happened and then given the opportunity to talk about the situation. Along with distraction techniques this can result in a calming of the situation without having to go down the route of sanctions.

 

A child using time out will be expected to return to class and continue their learning after a few minutes. The adult concerned will use their professional judgement as to the length of time a child needs for time out. 

 

 

Level 2 or 3

Once level 2 (card turned to white side) or level 3 (orange card) is reached, an adult may decide on a suitable sanction such as:

 

  • Moving the child to a designated place to work individually in class, returning to their own seat when they and the adult supervising feels they are ready to carry on properly.
  • A child missing all or part of their playtime, especially if their behaviour has meant that they have not completed the required learning or they have interrupted the learning of others.

 

As a school we recognise that low level behaviour can be disruptive and we aim to work with the parents to curb this from happening. Therefore a letter will be posted to Parents if a child has their card turned (level 2/3) 2 times in a term. The letter asks the Parent to speak to their child and informs them that two more occasions in that term, where the card is turned, would result in a ‘Red’ grade on the Termly Report. We believe that by alerting the Parents to this it gives them the opportunity to help their child to change their behaviour. The template can be found at the end of this policy, or on T-drive/Policy/Behaviour/Letters to Parents. Class teachers are asked to file a copy in their Green Class File and give a copy to the Mentors who will ensure the central school file is updated.

 

Serious Behaviour Incidents

Depending upon the severity of the incident, steps in this process may be ‘jumped’.

E.g.

  • A child who hurts another physically (after investigation) may have their voucher removed immediately.

  • Children involved in a ‘full on fight’, may go straight to red and be sent to a member of SLT.

  • If a child self-exits then teachers should use their professional judgement on which colour their card is turned to, based on the circumstances (eg: rude/defiant=red)

 

Exit from the classroom

When a child has to exit the classroom an exit form must be completed. On any occasion when a child has to exit the classroom, the class teacher will inform the Parent as soon as possible either face to face at the end of the day or by phone if a face to face meeting is not possible. If the teacher cannot contact the Parent they are asked to use out text system, informing the Parent that the child has been exited and asking the Parent to contact the school (class teacher) as soon as possible.

 

The exit forms can be found in T-drive/Policies/Behaviour/Exit Forms. The completed form should then be saved in the completed forms folder in the same place (ensure it is saved under the child’s name with the term and school year i.e. ‘Fred Bloggs Term 3 2011-2012’). This is then a record of behaviour for the school.

 

Please send a copy of any exit forms completed to the mentors who will ensure the central school file is updated.

 

If a child has 2 exits from class in any term, the Parents should be invited for a formal meeting to discuss the way forward with the class teacher to address the child’s behaviour and attitude. The form showing the 2 exits, should be saved on the T-drive, printed off, given to the Parent and a copy kept in the Green Class file.

 

Outside of the classroom environment

If incidents happen at playtime the teacher on duty should deal with it and should also inform the class teacher. They should use their professional judgement as to whether SLT need to be informed

At lunchtime, play leaders are encouraged to use diffusion techniques the same as in class. Only once these have been exhausted should they move on to the ‘Good to be Green’ strategies.  The class teacher should always be informed if this is the case, and the overview of the day’s behaviour needs to rest with the class teacher. If serious incidents happen at lunchtime the play leaders should inform the mentors who then may refer to SLT depending on the severity of the incident. 

For lunchtime sanctions (see Appendix 3)

 

 

 

House points

In our school all children can achieve house points. These are the system for rewarding good learning behaviour and achievement. Children can earn house points from any adult in school and they can be for wide ranging achievements such as: a high standard of attainment in any area of their education, for progress or for effort. When a child achieves a house point they need to record it on their house point chart. When they achieve the benchmarks of 25, 50, 75, etc. house points they receive a certificate in Collective Worship as well as a letter to go home to inform their Parents. House point numbers are collected by the Head of Houses each week and these are then displayed in the hall so that the children can celebrate how many house points have been achieved. The winning house for each term will receive the ‘House Cup’.

House points are also given out for other achievements, such as sporting success or inter-house competitions and these are also added to the totals. At the end of the year the house with the most house points, including those from sports day and inter-house tournaments, will receive the overall ‘House Point Trophy’.

 

Class Behaviour Certificates

Children will be rewarded with a class certificate on a weekly basis if the class teacher feels the whole class has behaved well all week. This will be coordinated by the Deputy Head Teacher.

 

Star of the Week

KS2 also have star of the week. Each class needs to appoint a class star (each teacher will decide the mechanism for this in their class). A child can only be considered for Star of the Week if they have still retained their behaviour voucher for each day of that week i.e. they must not have reached Step 2 or higher on the class sanctions scheme on any day that week. The ‘Star of the Week’ will be decided by the teacher and presented with a certificate in Key Stage Collective Worship. 

 

Additional Rewards

Class teachers may also have other rewards that they use within their class. These may vary between year groups depending on the age of the children and the makeup of the class. Examples of these would be systems such as the traffic light system, pebbles, smiley faces, stickers and stamps etc.   Across both Key Stages working with our ‘Good to be Green’ system there are also privilege cards that can be used to reward children.

 

Final Points:

  • Children should feel the emphasis is on rewards but also have a clear understanding of the consequences of inappropriate behaviour.
  • To aid staff there are a selection of ‘Quick Guides’ which can be found on the T-drive which summarise essential information.
  • This policy should be read in conjunction with all other school policies, in particular the Behaviour Policy and the Anti-Bullying Policy.
  • The word Parent has been used throughout this policy to mean any person with the legal guardianship of a child (i.e. Parent/Carer/Guardian etc)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix 1

 

 

Minster quick guide to............

 

Good to be Green

As part of quality first teaching all members of staff should use the techniques and strategies they have developed to control and diffuse any potential behaviour problems as part of the daily expectation.

 

When children go beyond this, after informal warnings and strategies have been used ‘Good to be Green’ comes into play.

 

Step 1 – Formal verbal warning given to the child and Good to be Green card is ‘upended’ and a reminder that if behaviour continues the behaviour voucher will be lost.

 

Step 2 – If poor behaviour continues the card is then turned over (so it is white) and the child loses their behaviour voucher. The child should be encouraged to tell their parent.

 

Step 3 – The next incident of poor behaviour results in the yellow warning card being displayed. Verbal warning that the next time they misbehave they will get a red card and be exited from class. If children are in danger of being exited at this stage a mentor should be called to support the child.

 

Step 4 – Finally, another incident would lead to a red card and exit from class to the KS Leader or another member of SLT if KS Leader not available. Mentors will transport the child to the member of SLT.  Parents should be informed by the class teacher that day. The teacher must fill in an exit form and give to the mentors.

 

Sanctions

The class teacher is responsible for the behaviour of all the pupils in their class at all times.

 

On the playground play leaders are encouraged to use diffusion techniques the same as in class. Only once these have been exhausted should they move on to the ‘Good to be Green’ strategies.  The class teacher should always be informed if this is the case, and the overview of the day’s behaviour needs to rest with the class teacher.

 

Serious Behaviour Incidents

Depending upon the severity of the incident, steps in this process may be ‘jumped’.

E.g.

  • A child who hurts another physically (after investigation) may have their voucher removed immediately.

  • Children involved in a ‘full on fight’, may go straight to red and be sent to a member of SLT.

  • If a child self-exits then teachers should use their professional judgement on which colour their card is turned to, based on the circumstances (eg: rude/defiant=red)

     

    If incidents happen at playtime the teacher on duty should deal with it and should also inform the class teacher. They should use their professional judgement as to whether SLT need to be informed. 

     

    If serious incidents happen at lunchtime the play leaders should inform the mentors who then may refer to SLT depending on the severity of the incident. 

 

 

 

Appendix 2

 

 

A quick guide to........

Diffusion Techniques – Classroom Management

Depending on the child and the circumstance, these are strategies to be used prior to card turning

  • Verbal warnings

  • Praise another child next to them

  • If you do this then I will ask you...

  • Strategic positioning

  • TA’s sat with difficult children in teacher input

  • < >

    Visual clues – e.g. zip lip

  • Signs – thumbs up etc

  • ‘The Look!’

  • Egg timer

  • Tone of voice

  • Seating arrangements

  • Catching somebody being good

  • Targeted questions

  • Removing things they are playing with

  • Fiddle toys

  • Peer pressure

  • Raise voice

  • Direct language but polite

  • Knowing and using names directly

  • Special Job

  • Lolly Sticks

  • Clapping patterns

  • Brain Gym

  • “If you waste my time.......”

  • “I like the way you are........” – positive

  • Time out for teachers!

  • Ignoring

  • Class rewards

 

 

 

Appendix 3

 

Minster quick guide to............

 

Lunchtime Playground Sanctions

 

At Minster we expect all children to enjoy a safe and happy playtime. Obviously, at times, their behaviour may not be acceptable and we need tools to help them learn to manage their behaviour and also sanctions to use when appropriate. No child should be on the playground without play leader supervision. Below is a quick guide:

 

Playground Areas

 

  • Active Area

    Ball games (no football)- children to be encouraged to play in teams, if a child is playing inappropriately then a quiet chat reminding them of the rules initially should be tried, should things continue remove them from the game for a period of time.

    KS2 Adventure playground – there should only be KS2 children from the designated class to be on this area on the agreed days. Y3 NO MONKEY BARS.

    Creative Area

    Pirate Ship – there should only be children from the designated class on this area on the agreed days. NO free running or balls in this area. The stage is not a climbing frame; creative play should be encouraged on this facility.

  • Discovery Area

    Please remind children of the safety aspects of playing with the stones, the tunnel is a living structure and children need to respect this. At times we may need to close this area should it become muddy.

  • Calm Area

    This is a small area, children need reminding that there should be no free running and that the area does not extend past the mentors first door.

  • All Weather Pitch

    Children are only allowed down on their designated day and the equipment is to be used sensibly. There should be no need for balls to be brought in from home thus avoiding ‘my game’ situations. The ultimate sanction for misbehaviour in this area is a ban, either one session or longer if necessary. This should always be discussed with the class teacher.

     

    Rough Play

    If there are children playing roughly in any area and they do not listen when asked to stop, ask them to leave the playground area / equipment for the rest of the session.

     

    What can we do? If, despite asking a child to stop, the behaviour carries on :-

  • Remove the child from the situation.

  • Assess what has preceded the incident to determine how to proceed

  • Sometimes all that will be required is that the child spends some time with a play leader away from the group

  • If a child is upset due to incident, Mentors can be called upon to assist.

  • Children may need to be removed to lunch club either to calm down or as a sanction. The class teacher should be made aware that the child has been off the playground.

  • If there has been a physical altercation all children involved need to be spoken/listened to, to determine how to proceed. Mentors to be called so a play leader does not have to leave the playground.Teachers need to be informed in order to make a decision on Good to be Green.

  • Any cause of concern should be reported back to the class teacher. Our children do go home and talk to their parents and if an incident has not been shared this can cause confusion should a parent wishes to discuss it.

     

     

     

     

    Appendix 4

     

    PSHE and Circle Time

     

    Circle time is class discussion on a more formal basis when the teacher may ensure that all children have an opportunity to speak and that their contribution is valued. How circle time is organised in every class is left to the teacher’s discretion but it is important to have circle times regularly (i.e. at least once a week) and to limit the time available for discussion to ensure that participants don’t ramble on! Circle time could be used at the end of the day to discuss the progress of a small group of pupils. Issues can be raised naturally but also there is room for set topics to be discussed at a given time e.g. behaviour at play-time.

     

    Circle time has an obvious role to play in the National Curriculum as an opportunity for speaking and listening, and as fulfilling an essential part of the spiritual and moral development of young people.

     

    Circle time can provide a forum for discussion of important issues; relationships, equal rights, friendship, freedom, justice, and acceptable behaviour.

     

    Circle time brings together the teacher and children in an enjoyable atmosphere of co-operation. It is a time set aside when children and their teacher sit together and may take part in games and activities designed to increase self-awareness, awareness of others, self-esteem, co-operation, trust and listening skills. The activity helps everyone to understand what is important to them and their friends. Children become more able to express their feelings and it encourages greater tolerance.

     

     

    Appendix 5

     

    Forms and letter templates

     

    Please complete this letter, print on headed paper, copy for your Green Class file and copy to the Mentors, then post original. Thank you

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Date ****

     

     

     

    Dear *****

     

    ‘Good to be Green’

     

     

    This letter is to inform you that your child, **** , has had their card turned on 2 occasions this term. This was for persistent low level disruptive behaviour.

     

    We wanted to make you aware of this because should their card be turned on two more occasions this term, they would then receive a red on their termly report.

     

    We hope that by giving you this information you will have the opportunity to discuss this with your child and reinforce the need for good learning behaviour in school.

     

     

    Please contact school if you wish to discuss anything with me.

     

    Yours sincerely

     

     

     

    Class Teacher

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Name__________________________________Class_________

     

    Exit Form – Child has received their Red Card on the good to be green system and exited from class.

Date-

Behaviour

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After 2 occasions of a child receiving a red card in one term, Parents will be contacted to arrange a meeting to discuss strategies and the way forward in managing and addressing their child’s behaviour.

 

 

The word Parent has been used throughout this policy to mean any person with the legal guardianship of a child (i.e. Parent/Carer/Guardian etc)

 

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